adding guest house to existing well

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog' started by jk13, Nov 4, 2008.

  1. jk13

    jk13 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Hi, I am upgrading existing plumbing in guest house, and am asking for advice about increased demand from existing well. Submersible, 20/40, 30gal bladder tank, guest house is 60 -70 ft. from existing tank. thanks
  2. Southern Man

    Southern Man DIY Hillbilly

    Messages:
    530
    Location:
    North Carolina
    If the well never ran out of water in the old house it's doubtful that a little used guest house would cause problems. But of course it depends on your well yield and how much the house is actually used.

    I'd set a new pressure tank in the guest house and feed it with a 3/4" line tee'd off the existing line from your well.
  3. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    I agree, but I don't see where the extra tank would do any good.

    bob...
  4. Southern Man

    Southern Man DIY Hillbilly

    Messages:
    530
    Location:
    North Carolina
    It should eliminate the potential for pressure losses in the guest house due to the long run of supply pipe.
  5. jk13

    jk13 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    thanks for the vote of confidence, and the suggestion about the second tank, the potential pressure loss is my intuitive concern. We haven t run out of water in the main house but my wife would like increased pressure, any thoughts on that?
  6. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    Increase the pipe size to the guest room if pressure is a concern. The tank will only give you a short burst of better pressure than go right back to what is in the system already.

    bob...
  7. jk13

    jk13 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Thanks, - is there a way to increase existing pressure in the main house without changing sub. pump?
    john
  8. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    You could try turning up the pressure switch. If you have a sub, it should go higher. I like 50/70.

    bob...
  9. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,426
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    Anything is better than 20/40, turn up the pressure switch. I also agee that a larger line to the guest house will give you better pressure, and another tank will not help.
  10. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,515
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    tank

    As long as the second tank is interconnected with the first one so the pressure switch responds to its usage, it will give better volume.
  11. jk13

    jk13 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    thanks for the help, I am curious about the mysteries of these pressure switches. what I am understanding is that they can be treated as a "reastat in ratio" then why are they sold as specific settings, 20/40, 30/50 etc.?
  12. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,426
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    One pressure tank will give you volume for one minute, two pressure tanks will give you volume for two minutes. After that, all you have is what the pump can supply through the size of flow line you have. And that is only if the pressure tank(s) happen to be full when you start using water. The pressure tank(s) could just as easily be empty when you start using water. You have no control over this. With a 40/60 pressure switch, the pressure could be anywhere from 40 to 60 when you start using water. If it happen to be at 60, you will get volume from the tank. If it happened to be at 41, the tanks will actually be another load for the pump when it starts. So the pump will have to produce the amount of water you are using, as well as refill the pressure tank(s) at the same time. While the pump is refilling the pressure tank(s), you will be starved for volume in the house.

    Pressure tanks where never designed to give you volume or stored water, only to prevent the pump from cycling on and off too often. A 119 gallon pressure tank only holds about 30 gallons of water. Even with two of these, you will rip through 60 gallons of water quickly in the house, then again, all you have left is what the pump can produce through the size of line you have. Your stored water is in the ground. There are millions of acre feet of water stored in the aquifers under our feet. This is where your volume of water comes from, not a pressure tank. You just need a large enough pump, and large enough water lines, to supply the amount of water you need. Then if you have a device to limit pump cycling, even a 1 gallon pressure tank is all that you need.
  13. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,426
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    Just tighten the big adjustment screw in the pressure switch to increase the pressure. Even a 20/40 pressure switch should adjust up to about 40/60.
  14. jk13

    jk13 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    thanks for the clarity in your explanation, to probe further, the bladder tank remains unaffected by the increase in switch pressure?
  15. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    I'm not sure what you mean by that statement.

    bob...
  16. jk13

    jk13 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    yeah, in response to the advice to simply increase pressure ratio the question that comes to my inexperienced mind is - does the increase in pump switch pressure to say 40/60 affect the air pressure in the bladder tank, I recall reading in a post about the air pressure in bladder tank has a relation to switch pressure setting does 38lbs psi for 20/40 switch ring true or am I confusing the issue. I am not only trying to avoid trouble down the road, but it is the old story - the more I learn the more I learn what I don t know. I haven t had the opportunity to learn what there is to know about this aspect of the plumbing universe so it is unraveling like a mystery, one question leading to another. Without you guys out there I m high and dry. So thanks again it's really helpful
    john
  17. jk13

    jk13 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    thanks, again spot on help. valveman on tanks and pumps forum - clear explanation of what I was thinking regarding bladder in tank being affected by simply cranking pressure switch without checking air pressure in tank.
  18. jk13

    jk13 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    thanks for the link bob, a wealth of new info to delve into. the final word - as I now understand, I am going to drain tank, check air, add air to 38psi adjust switch to 40/60 and refill is this correct ?
  19. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    You've got it!

    bob...
  20. masterpumpman

    masterpumpman New Member

    Messages:
    729
    Location:
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Add a Cycle Stop Valve!

    Add a Cycle Stop Valve www.cyclestopvalves.com in the line to get a constant pressure (like city water pressure). You're wife will love it!
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