a plumber installed this for me -- was it done properly?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by Pickngrin, Jan 1, 2012.

  1. Pickngrin

    Pickngrin Member

    Messages:
    55
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Happy New Year. I had a plumber come to install a drain for a utility sink in my garage. This is what he did. I'm not a plumber, but I thought that the sink drain had to run into a vertical drain. The drain stack is behind that wall stud, to the left of the fitting that he installed. The copper pipe running through the drywall is the drain from the bathroom sink. I asked him about the angling of the drain and he said that it didn't have to be angled. That doesn't seem consistent with what I've read, but again, I'm not a plumber. He told me to make a little riser for the plastic sink out of 2 x 4. Is this OK or do I have a problem? By the way, I figured out not to use the sink on the other side of the wall (he did not install the sink itself) before the sink is attached, but he never bothered to tell me not to.
    Thanks.

    IMG_20111231_092345.jpg
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2012
  2. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,260
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    Looks like it was done by the lowest bidder. A sink drain needs to be 2", and it needs to be pitched to the main. It cannot be connected to the main stack without a vent if there are other fixtures draining into the stack above it.

    Next time you hire someone, insist that they get a permit and inspection done prior to paying.
    Are you sure he was a plumber?
  3. Pipewrench

    Pipewrench In the Trades

    Messages:
    41
    Location:
    Jackson MS
    So did he just access th copper drain then put that tee in the line? I'm not sure what you're talking about on the 2x4 riser. I'm not crazy about the rubber fernco either. Looks terrible. I would have used a male and female fittings to make the transition to pvc for better support. Other than looking cheap it should work ok for a shop sink. Looks like your dryer vent is running along the floor there also. Is that gonna be in the way??? Good luck buddy
  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,268
    Location:
    New England
    The coupling he used is not approved for internal use - it needs to be a banded coupling. Plus, I don't think it would pass as it doesn't appear to be vented, reductions in size are not permitted, and a T is not the proper fitting to attach into a drain line, even if the rest was okay. while a permit may add some to the cost, it also ensures you get it done right the first time in most cases.
  5. Was the work done for less than $100?
  6. dlarrivee

    dlarrivee New Member

    Messages:
    1,172
    Location:
    Canada
    No it was not done properly. It could have been a little worse, but not much.
  7. I've been put in this situation before, where "doing it right" involves a considerable amount of money and effort to do it correctly.


    To do it correctly,


    Get to where that drain stack is, remove the tee and install a tee that is 2" by the size of that stack. From there, you either design the piping with incorporation of a wye with the ability to vent those fixtures individually or not.

    The work shows they just added a tee into an existing trap arm off the other fixture.


    To do the job correctly, there's considerably more money involved to do it right.
  8. Tom Sawyer

    Tom Sawyer In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,267
    Location:
    Maine
    That's ugly man, just plain ugly and, it in no way meets code.
  9. dlarrivee

    dlarrivee New Member

    Messages:
    1,172
    Location:
    Canada
    The title of the thread asks the question.

    If it costs too much, maybe the sink doesn't go in.
  10. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,260
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    The plumber could replace rest of the copper with pvc and make a profit on the scrap copper alone. :p
  11. johnjh2o1

    johnjh2o1 Plumbing Contractor for 49 years

    Messages:
    1,143
    Location:
    South*East
    He also used a compression fitting in the copper line that will not be accessible.

    John
  12. dlarrivee

    dlarrivee New Member

    Messages:
    1,172
    Location:
    Canada
    I just noticed the compression fitting.

    He must be one hell of a "plumber".
  13. Pickngrin

    Pickngrin Member

    Messages:
    55
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Ugh. Yeah, my gut told me this was not right. He claimed to be licensed although I never asked for a license #. I don't have much experience hiring plumbers and have learned my lesson from this experience. I figured it was an easy job for anyone competent (competent being the key word here) and didn't worry too much about it. He drives a van advertising drain cleaning. Perhaps he lies about being a plumber. Anyhow, I am actually going to email him and tell him I received feedback that there are problems with this installation. My main concern now is the compression fittings inside the wall, in case they leak. I'm going to tell him that's a problem. I doubt he will rectify it, but it's worth asking. If he doesn't do it, would it make sense for me to replace them (I do know how to solder fittings)? Would it make sense for me to replace that rubber coupling?
    Again, I'm looking at this as a lesson learned.

    Thanks again.
  14. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,049
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    I am not sure WHY he used the rubber coupling when all he had to do was solder a stub of copper into the tee. He did a "quick and dirty" installation, but I am sure he was the cheapest "plumber" you talked to. Most plumbers are also sewer cleaners. Few "sewer cleaners" are plumbers.
  15. Pickngrin

    Pickngrin Member

    Messages:
    55
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    He was the only "plumber" I spoke to, actually. Would it make sense for me to replace the rubber coupling with a length of copper? What about the compression fittings?
  16. DonL

    DonL Jack of all trades Master of one

    Messages:
    4,450
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    I would say for the price that you paid, It was a job well done...
  17. Tom Sawyer

    Tom Sawyer In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,267
    Location:
    Maine
    I would bet because he didn't have the copper or the fitting and it was a whole lot easier and cheaper to hack what he hacked.

    And this was done in Massachusetts which further confirms my opinion regarding the lack of supervision of Mass plumbers. The license in Mass is a joke in most areas because they don't have near enough inspectors to check on things
  18. Pickngrin

    Pickngrin Member

    Messages:
    55
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Here's a follow up. I emailed the plumber today and told him that I showed a picture of the installation to a plumber (I didn't say 'multiple plumbers on the internet'). I said that my main concern at this point is the compression fittings that won't be accessible. He emailed back stating that it is not a code violation and that there is no issue but that he would change them out for me. Then a few minutes later he emailed me again stating that he looked in his code book and whoops, made a "stupid mistake" as he put it. He is telling me that he will make right on this and wants me to be satisfied. To his credit, he may not be competent, or a plumber, but he seems to be upstanding in this sense. Another thing that made me question his competence when he was here was that he recommended that I remove the rigid metal dryer vent (near the floor) and replace it with an ABS pipe that goes has three 90 degree bends (going up the wall, across, and then down the other wall). My understanding is that ABS is not good to use for the dryer vent, and that multiple bends are not good. He told me that if I got the parts, he would help me install it without charging. Again, my take is that this is a bad idea.
    What do you guys think?
  19. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,298
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    ABS pipe burns pretty good. I would never run a dryer vent in material that melts and burns.
  20. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    I believe any building code prohibits plastic pipe for dryers. They don't even allow the vinyl flex lines, which used to be common for dryer hook ups. This is building code, not plumbing code.
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