30" electric freestanding range wiring

Discussion in 'Electrical Forum discussion & Blog' started by ballvalve, Feb 2, 2012.

  1. ballvalve

    ballvalve General Engineering Contractor

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    Must all range outlets be 50 amp plugs with 6 gauge or larger wire, or may I use 8 gauge wire if I have a range that has a maximum draw of 38 AMPS? Using thhn copper in conduit for the run, about 30 feet.

    I would guess the answer is what will the next guy plug into it, or is there a dedicated 40 amp plug-cord set?
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    Can't help on the gauge, but keep in mind any new wiring should be for a four-wire plug: two hots, neutral, and ground. Only when you are reusing an existing 3-wire circuit can you keep it, not on a new one. this may affect the size of the conduit you use.
  3. jwelectric

    jwelectric Electrical Contractor/Instructor

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    Using #8 THHN copper you could use a 50 amp breaker and receptacle but if you wanted to you could use a 40 amp breaker and receptacle.

    I doesn’t matter what “might” happen with someone else all that matters is what you are connecting at the time.

    The one thing I always teach to the inspectors that take my class is that they are inspectors not expect-ors so what might happen does not matter.
  4. ballvalve

    ballvalve General Engineering Contractor

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  5. Chad Schloss

    Chad Schloss Member

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  6. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

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    #8 wire is marginal for your range, but if you use it, then connect it to a 40 amp breaker, regardless of the amp rating of the receptacle.
  7. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

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    That is true. Standard NEMA receptacles for 120/240 appliances are 30 amp and 50 amp. Of course, you can use a 20 amp, or 40 amp, breaker as the appliance dictates. Wiring must be sufficient for the receptacle used, not just for the breaker.
  8. jwelectric

    jwelectric Electrical Contractor/Instructor

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    Gentlemen

    The breaker is installed to protect the conductors not the receptacle. It would be perfectly legal to install a 40 amp breaker and a 50 amp receptacle for a range Table 210.21(B)(3).

    What would not be legal would be to install a 50 amp breaker and a 40 amp receptacle.

    Many AC units throughout this nation are wired with less than a 60 amp conductor and overcurrent device that land in a 60 amp no-fuse disconnect legally.
  9. ActionDave

    ActionDave Electrician

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    Absolutely correct. I have never wired up a 40A recpt for a range. Never. Not once.

    That's different, they don't plug in. ;-)
  10. jwelectric

    jwelectric Electrical Contractor/Instructor

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    A receptacle and a cord cap is nothing more than a means of disconnect. Other than the physical shape of the two there is no difference between a receptacle and a no-fuse disconnect
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