3 questions reagarding fenceing

Discussion in 'Lawn Care/Landscaping' started by DIY, Apr 27, 2007.

  1. DIY

    DIY New Member

    Messages:
    153
    Location:
    Florida
    I have had a split vote up till now whether to use chain link fenceing or wooden fenceing (stockade style), and those opinions come from fenceing builders and from what i have read. My primary goals are privacy,marking boundry lines,and security. Chain link you can see through. That is my main reason to be dubious about chain link. The wooden fence one can not see through,but is said to not last as long as chain link. The fence is for a backyard area that backs up to vegetation then next to that is a duplex. Chain link is said to last longer than a wooden PT fence.The debate goes on just wanted to get some opinions from here.

    As far as some other areas in my front yard area i would like to landscape a fence of bushes in a line. What kind of "general plants/bushes" would be good for that that grow fairly quickly,bushee and full and grow to 2 to 4 ft. high?
    This will be in Florida,most things grow in the soil here according to a soil sample test,partial to full sun,and hearty. Preferably a plant /bush that blooms as well. Thanks all!
  2. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,026
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    fence

    Chain link with plastic slats in it will give privacy, but will also look "trailer park".
  3. Rancher

    Rancher Guest

    And those slats are expensive, I priced the aluminum ones.

    Bushes, for Florida... ask a nursery. Arborvite, Oleandar are two, and there are some hedges... privit?

    Rancher
  4. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    My wifes friend gave her some cuttings off a fast growing (for the lack of another word since nobody seems to know what these plants are) weed. They give off pretty blue flowers twice a year, grow real fast and get about 4 feet the first year and about a foot per year after to a height of about 7 feet. We planted them three feet apart and three years later you can't hardly see through them in the winter. In the summer there is no way you can see through them. They do best in full sun. In half sun, they don't do well at all.

    If you want some cuttings, I'm in Riverview near Tampa. Be glad to give you all you want. It's the best thing we have found and we have tried Banana trees, Lagustrum, Rubber trees, Casia (which is second best) and several other varaties.

    bob...
  5. Cookie

    Cookie .

    Messages:
    5,658
    Location:
    .
    I have these in my back and they are wonderful.
    Here is a link to them:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cytisus

    There is also, one which comes from NZ. They are beautiful plants, are pretty hardy, they take my weather. The name is, Cytisus.
  6. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    Looks like it would take a lot of them to make a hedge Cookie.

    bob...
  7. Cookie

    Cookie .

    Messages:
    5,658
    Location:
    .
    Mine are very wide. I can't say how many there are in there, but, they are really nice. I would speculate, no more than anyother hedge, just so far apart. I would check with a nursery if you like them, Bob.
  8. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    How tall will they get? And do you know if they will like the Florida climate?

    bob...
  9. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    Which way did the hanging chads fall? Have you consulted the Gore campaign for assistance in making the vote come out the way it should??
  10. alternety

    alternety Like an engineer

    Messages:
    671
    Location:
    Washington
    Introduced Broom is an exceedingly invasive plant in the Pacific Northwest.
  11. Alectrician

    Alectrician DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    689
    Fence block..$20 per foot installed if you shop right. It will outlast you if installed properly (grout the top course)
  12. Kiril

    Kiril New Member

    Messages:
    87
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    1) Wood will last a very long time, longer than you, if you use PT posts and rails and protect the bottom of the post from the soil by building up the concrete. If you can find them, there are also impact plastic posts that are supposed to last for 100+ years. Personally I have used both and think they both can last 100 years + if built properly, plus they look WAY better than any chain link.

    2) Bamboo will give you a very quick live fence. You can take a look at this site for ideas. http://www.bambooheadquarters.com/
  13. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    I was going to use Bamboo a year ago until I priced it. WoW are they proud of Bamboo. I have a nursury locally that specializes in nothing but Bamboo. His prices are over the top.

    bob...
  14. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    How about Kudzu?
  15. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    I like that idea Bob, or I can send them some Potato's. I have millions of them since I declared war on the Potato vines that have tried to take over my fence lines. They are probably a distant cousin of Kudzu, since they like to crawl over vegetation and block the sunlight, killing the shrubs.

    bob...

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