1/4 turn supply stops--question

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by fatdaddy, Dec 10, 2008.

  1. fatdaddy

    fatdaddy New Member

    Messages:
    64
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Is sweating preferred to compression? They are under a kitchen sink and while the counter is being replaced I thought I would replace the stops as well.They work,but are sort of old and crusty.
    If both methods are the same,perhap I should go with no-sweat since my soldering is not perfect.
    Thanks in advance.
  2. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,043
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    stops

    Let's put it this way. I know how to solder, but have not installed a single sweat fixture stop, EVER. Either screw on or compression, with very few screw on except for replacements.
  3. fatdaddy

    fatdaddy New Member

    Messages:
    64
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Thanks for the quick response.

    The whole house had stops that were sweated on. I think I may try to go the compression fitting route this time.
    Alan
  4. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,043
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    stops

    If the plumber was going to solder one on, he would have done the whole house the same way. In a union area, they would do it to make a homeowner repair more difficult, thus increasing the likelihood that he would call a plumber to do it.
  5. fatdaddy

    fatdaddy New Member

    Messages:
    64
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Any tricks to a compression fitting onto 1/2" copper?

    I will be attaching hot and cold flexible supple lines to the stops.Using TFF Paste as well unless advised not to.
  6. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    Compression fittings should not have paste, and especially no teflon tape. You can use a light brushing of plumbers grease, or light machine oil, on the threads and ferrule to ease future disassembly.
  7. fatdaddy

    fatdaddy New Member

    Messages:
    64
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Sorry. I will paste the male side where the flexible

    supply line will attach,not the 1/2" copper side.

    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 10, 2008
  8. gardner

    gardner DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    224
    Location:
    Ontario
    That is also a compression fitting, unless you take the nut off and attach a braided supply line. The braided lines have a rubber gasket at each end. Either way, no dope, no tape.
  9. fatdaddy

    fatdaddy New Member

    Messages:
    64
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Ok. I guess I am the dope!

    I recall a person (not here) telling me to use Teflon paste on the male side of the stop where I will be attaching the braided flex line.If you say not to,I won't.
    Thanks.
  10. kingsotall

    kingsotall Plunger/TurdPuncher

    If it ruins the seal I'm not putting pipe dope on 'em either. Some people just slather it on everything, like it's going outta style.
  11. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

    Messages:
    7,450
    Location:
    Connecticut
    When I use compression I grease the threads on the side using the brass ferrule and the braided supply goes on dry. Careful in the brass ferrule se do not over tighten it as it causes leakage.
  12. fatdaddy

    fatdaddy New Member

    Messages:
    64
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Well.The story continues.

    Now,the stops in place were not in the best shape but I figured I would replace them while the counter tops are off and I had room to work. I bought the stops yesterday and had an hour or so betwqeen chores so I went to the basement and shut off the lines to one sink.Pretty tough.The in-line shut-offs were corroded and the hot just shattered.I managed to close the valves but,sure enough,they did nothing.
    End of saga. I am going to use the existing stops under the sinks and sometime in the future I will replace the shut-off valves downstairs.
    Sure burns my bacon that one job leads to another...to another...to another.
    I like to delay stuff like that for warmer days.
    Thanks for all your advice.
    Alan
  13. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,043
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    supply

    NO paste anywhere. It will not help, and could cause the rubber seal in the sonnector to deteriorate.
  14. CarlH

    CarlH New Member

    Messages:
    175
    Location:
    Northern VA
    That would be the plumber that was used when my house was built. All of the fittings had pipe dope all over them. This would be compression fittings, ballcock fittings, shower heads, etc. The only places where it was used that bothers me is the shower heads and toilet shut off valves. Those are visible and look cruddy with pipe dope all over them. And this just reminded me that they stripped the head a bit on the decorative (chrome plated) screws on things like the bathtub overflow covers. How tight does it need to be? grumble. At least none of it has leaked.
  15. kingsotall

    kingsotall Plunger/TurdPuncher

    Not all that tight. Something you get a feel for. Definitely not wrenching down on it. They most likely cross threaded the screw. I am all in favor of going willy nilly with the dope, (on fittings that would benefit from them) but what I learned early on is that you carry a rag with you and wipe up all the access. Does not take that much longer.
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